Introduction: AHS: Then & Now

CHRISTIAN NGUYEN Staff Writer Alhambra High School has proudly been the home of the Moors for a little over a century. Ever since its establishment in 1898, AHS has seen many changes. It is currently 2016 and the school is as strong as ever. It is important for the students to know the history of our school and the changes it has gone through for us to truly show the Moor pride.

Better Than Before, but Still Striving for Moor

YI-FENG HO Staff Writer Over the course of 118 years, Alhambra High School had many accomplishments throughout multiple generations of students, administrators and faculty. The campus has improved and expanded greatly over the years. The school’s addition of the C and the D buildings in the mid-1990s, and the science building in 2010, which includes 10 science laboratories, increased the number of classrooms on campus. Besides the eight buildings on campus, Alhambra High School also has two gyms, a track field, and Moor field, where the sport teams play games….

Moor Truth

NGUYEN KIM TRAN Staff Writer In European history, the Moors were a nomadic people, known for their architecture, religion and knowledge. According to the book The Golden Age of Moors by Ivan Van Sertima, many European universities were established during the time when Moorish science and literature flourished in the Iberian Peninsula. In these schools, Moorish treatises and texts were often translated from Arabic to Latin as tools to study. As the rulers of Spain, the Moors continued to respect the languages, political rights and cultures of the conquered people….

It Is Fair to Say: Not Another Popularity Contest

180 days of the year, teachers are entered into a popularity contest and students get to be the judges. In a way, the stereotypes about high school popularity are true. The difference is rather than cheerleaders and athletes, the popular crew consists of educators that the student body deems the “best.” The notion of crossing our fingers and hoping we get the nice teacher is absurd. The pattern of picking classes and dropping classes because of the teacher needs to stop. The fear of not getting an “A” at the…

AHS Revives Science Olympiad Club

LYNN ZHANG Staff Writer Recently, two of AHS’s science teachers, Michelle Berry and Celine Valentine, restarted the Science Olympiad club. The club’s main objective is to prepare for and compete in the annual Science Olympiad competition. “[It’s] a good opportunity. It seems like a fun way to get people involved in science,” freshman Catherine Driscoll said. The competition has 23 team events, which includes both hands-on and traditional test-taking. During their meetings, members will prepare for their respective events by studying for the testing portion or doing practice trials for…

Time For Epi-Penalties

JESSICA YEE XIAOYE WANG Copy Editor Staff Writer For individuals struggling with lethal allergies, epinephrine, which is usually delivered via an EpiPen, is a necessity that could mean the difference between life and death. But since Mylan, an American global pharmaceutical company, purchased the rights to its production in 2007, prices for this life-saving drug have been exploding at an exponential rate. The price of the Epipen has skyrocketed, increasing 500% since 2008. Unfortunately, the dramatic price increase leaves low-income families behind. Epipens tend to expire after a year, which…

Colleges Earn An ‘F’ in Minority Support

Jesse Hernandez Staff Writer A recent USA Today report states that as of 2013, 64 percent of white college students graduated while only 50 percent of underrepresented minorities such as African Americans, Native Americans and Hispanic students graduated in over 255 of the California colleges. The push by the state and federal government in integrating minorities into higher education has been successful in increasing admittance rates; however, new procedures must be in place to increase graduation rates. The same report argues that nearly one-third of the colleges and universities that…

Say Bye-Bye to Starting School Earlier

MICHELLE LIN Staff Writer In an article published by Southern California Public Radio (SCPR), 20 Los Angeles Unified School districts started school in early August. In comparison to last year, Alhambra High School started August 11th, three days earlier. SCPR also stated that this can greatly affect our students as well as an increase in school funding and teaching. “Starting school early is good because we will be able to finish the curriculum before winter break and since in the past, we had to finish the semester after winter break,”…

Moor vs. Moor: Teacher Tenure

VICKY LAM Staff Writer Teachers hold the valuable position of expanding the knowledge of students nationwide. In order to keep this position, tenure laws exists. The tenure policy is the shield granted to teachers after a certain amount of probation time, preventing them from being fired. With the recent Vergara vs. California case (ending with favor towards educators) that reached the Supreme Court, tenure and the efficiency of teachers are being questioned. Teachers need stable protection against the possibility of being laid off. Statistics from the Federal Reserve Economic Data…

ATA Works to Further Communication

FARRAH LUU Editor in Chief On May 25th, 2016, Tammy Scorcia was elected as the new president of the Alhambra Teacher Association (ATA). ATA has about 900 active union members to promote and protect the well-being of every member. “My biggest goal is to bridge the communication gap in Associates and Management. Schools can’t run effectively if everyone is on a different page. Making sure that the family we’ve created will run smoothly and be able to have open dialogue with each other,” ATA President Tammy Scorcia said. ATA had…